• Life,  Martial Arts

    A Learning Experiment

    by It’s funny how the human brain works, sometimes. Although, in this case, I mostly mean my brain. A lot of methods of teaching seem to be to break things down to a very fine level, teach the first piece of it, and then build from there, either piece by piece or layer by layer depending on what it is you’re teaching. And there are a number of different ways of teaching and learning, frequently depending on the methodology that works best for the student and often involving how very senses contribute to the process for that student. Most big things are made up of little things, but a lot…

  • Martial Arts

    The Stages of Making Your Own Martial Arts Weapon For the First Time When You Have No Woodworking Skills

    by For reference, the Tekko is a traditional martial arts weapon from Okinawa. A lot of them look like they may have been derived from horse stirrups. The type you see in this post hasn’t, obviously, but these also involved the least amount of cutting work. As the title of the post suggests, I have no woodworking skills, so this seemed like a good idea for a starting point when I decided to make my own, especially if I wanted to keep all of my fingers. On to the actual post. Start with the picture of what you want. Analyze that picture. Measure what you need to (including your hand…

  • Martial Arts

    The 100 Kobudo Kata Challenge

    by There are certain events in the martial arts year that somehow speak to me. In April, we have the 100 Kobudo Kata Challenge. The basic idea of that is that you do 100 repetitions of a weapon kata. Ordinarily, this would be done as an event, as a group, or as a dojo. That’s not really how things work right now. My kobudo journey is still young. I “know” a few kata, but none of them really well yet. Still, I thought this might be something I would like to try. I mean, 100 repetitions of the same kata in one day? It may not sound exiting to you,…

  • Life

    Studying Kobudo

    by In my post on karate, I alluded to the idea that I’m walking other martial paths, too. I’m going to draw your attention to kobudo which, many sources seem to want to tell me, means “old martial way”. More descriptively, traditional Okinawan weapons. In the case of the system I’m studying, there are four primary weapons. The Bo: The Sai: The Tonfa: And the Nunchaku: Note I said primary weapons. Depending on the path you’re taking, there may be fifteen or sixteen you’ll encounter along the way, but these are “the big four”. There are some out there who are probably already asking why? Kobudo isn’t like empty-handed self…